Monday, February 11, 2008

Countdown to Bike Master Plan: Five Days, Five Stories

As we count down to the hearings for the City of Los Angeles' new Bike Master Plan, I thought we could take a look at what other cities are doing when it comes to planning a city that is safe and enjoyable for cyclists. I was all set to write about Chicago and they're bike loving Mayor, but then I heard Gordon Price talk about some big news out of London. Naturally, by the time I got home Streetsblog had more than covered it, but here we go anyway.

Earlier today, London Mayor Ken Livingston released what is probably the world's first billion dollar bike plan.

"By ensuring that Londoners have easy access to bikes in the centre of the capital, as well as making our city a safer and more enjoyable place to cycle, we will build upon London’s leading position as the only major world city to have achieved a switch from private car use to public transport, cycling and walking," Livingston said in a statement.

The five parts of the Mayor's plan are:
  1. A Central London bike hire scheme, similar to the recently launched Paris scheme, with up to 6,000 bikes located across docking stations every 300m so Londoners and visitors have quick and easy access to a bike. This will be supported by a series of easily navigable routes so that people can enjoy London’s sights by bike.
  2. Around a dozen radial Cycling Corridors for commuters to provide high-profile, easy to follow cycling streams into central London.
  3. The creation of a series of Bike Zones for shoppers and the school run in Inner and Outer London, with cycle priority streets, 20mph speed limits and quick, clear and simple routes that link key local destinations and open parks and waterways for cyclists.
  4. The expansion of the Legible London signage system to help people make short trips around the capital on foot, rather than driving, or taking the bus and tube.
  5. Working with the London Boroughs on the establishment of 200 Streets of Gold – urban makeovers which link key local destinations like stations, schools and shops in inner and outer London with high quality walking facilities, delivering improved pavements, seating and crossings alongside regeneration measures.
Image: This is London, via Streetsblog

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